Sick peeps?

So, I have a bit of a fever and some cold-like symptoms, I can go into detail if people need reference…
Started feeling a little weird a couple days ago but I thought it was just me, but na’ I’ll keep y’all updated. If it stays the same or gets worse I’ll try to go get tested on monday… is that reasonable?

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The CDC has guidance for if you think you are sick: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/if-you-are-sick/steps-when-sick.html

Testing at the City’s Public Health Laboratory requires a clinician referral: https://www.sfdph.org/dph/alerts/coronavirus-testing.asp

If you do decide to seek medical attention, call ahead—don’t just go straight to the doctor; give them a heads-up first. Or call 911 if you can’t think straight (e.g., due to hypoxia) or otherwise have serious symptoms.

I hope this turns around for you without further intervention.

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Brave of you to report it Robert!
Keep us updated and hope you get well soon.
I think a lot of us are also freaking out as allergy season comes around.

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thanks, that what I thought, allergies were picking up, that was about a week ago…super light like 1 sneeze / 2 days…
And the only way we can soften the spread is to communicate with eachother. I’m still planning to host CHM…I’ll record some videos just in case…

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Cool, sounds good. Fever is a warning sign it is not allergies though, so take care!

yea, that’s what I was thinking, it’s super light, but I can feel it. It’s so against how I roll to stop just because of a light fever. But them viruses are a changing…

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Take your temperature regularly—at least once a day, maybe twice—and keep a log. Bring it with you if you end up going in to the professionals.

If you have a pulse oximeter, use that (and log those results), too.

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@boredzo thank you, I’ll start doing that.

FWIW I also have had low level symptoms since March 13th. I think the last time I was in the space was the 10th for the meeting. I could be wrong.

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RE: the pulse oximeter there are some phone apps that use your phones flash and camera to get your pulse and heart rate. I use them from time to time. (Search heart rate monitor in the app stores)

Thanks for the update too Steve! Hope you get better.

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Note that heart rate monitors don’t necessarily include pulse oximetry. (The Apple Watch doesn’t, for example.) The latter is the important bit here: The use of a pulse oximeter is to measure blood oxygen saturation and detect when it becomes too low (hypoxemia). The purpose of monitoring for this is that one of COVID-19’s symptoms is pneumonia.

There’s also the obligatory disclaimers about using your phone rather than a real oximeter, though if you’re holed up and self-isolating (the correct thing to do when you suspect you may have COVID-19) and don’t already have a real oximeter, hopefully it’s better than nothing.

At any rate, I downloaded one for iOS called “Pulse Oximeter” and it seems to work OK, with the caveat that I don’t have a real oximeter myself so I can’t check the readings against one.

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Quick note on pulse oximeters (especially apps): If you feel short of breath/like you can’t get enough air (what the CDC calls “trouble breathing” among other symptoms), don’t let the oximeter overrule you. Call 911.

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Anyone sick with the virus is eligible to apply for disability insurance and receive $$ benefits from California EDD. This can also be in addition to Unemployment Benefits you qualify for due to lost, or even reduced, work from your employer honoring Shelter-in-Place.

Long time ago in the Air Force, my appendix burst and I was in a military hospital for a few weeks. Given the way they “went in” (exploratory surgery) it left me with a huge vertical scar on my abdomen and as you might guess, pain when I breathed deeply. Since they wanted it to be able to drain, they didn’t add stitches for quite some time.

So as a related problem of not breathing deeply, I began to develop a case of pneumonia which is typical for things like this. They gave me an apparatus to breathe into which looked a lot like a waterless version of that scene in The Right Stuff where those guys are competing with each other to keep a ping pong ball aloft in a tube. I had to exercise with this thing for a good hour a day. It’s uncomfortable but it’s a necessary part of fighting off pneumonia. If it were me, I would practice exhaling slowly and deeply. It seemed to help me, for what it’s worth.