Is our community radically open?

Are we radically open in the present?

Are we “radically open” enough?

Are there ways our community should be more or less radically open?

Noisebridge isn’t radically open. The door is not open. As far as I know, we do not strive to be radically open, rather Noisebridge strives to be a community of people.

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Noisebridge is at this point a 10-year experiment in a space trying to be radically open. The results of this experiment are that 90% of the people that such a policy ends up attracting are the sort of people who degrade and leech off our community, and cause lame drama in general. The other 10% are the sort of people that radical inclusion was supposed to attract. The former 90% end up sucking up the energy of the people who are stewarding the space at the time, and burning them out. This is why radical inclusion doesn’t work for us in practice.

It might work at a space that was committed to spending all of its energy dealing out social justice, rather than hacking, but that’s not us

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Just to clarify the “90% of the people that such a policy ends up attracting” make up for <1% of the people who actually use Noisebridge right?

Is there a difference between 1% of a group sucking 100% of the energy out of the space and 90% of a group sucking 100% of the energy?

I think “be excellent to eachother” does not mean the same thing as radical openness. I like the analogy that I’ve heard used in some tours recently - think of Noisebridge as someone else’s living room or better yet your friend’s living room. Radical openness is cool for a minute, until someone takes a shit in the living room, and then it’s not cool.

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Radical openness, practically, in San Francisco, in the Mission, means that a bunch of fucking randos are going to come in off the street who have almost no interest in hacking or tech or whatever, and start arguing that since noisebridge is a space that’s focused on social justice and anarchism blah blah blah blah blah that they have the right to sleep there and who is anyone to say otherwise. This has happened before. This will happen again, except that it won’t because we won’t let it. Noisebridge is not radically open.

also, who is anonymous9? u trollin bro?

Radical openness also means that our meetings will come to be dominated by people bringing their petty interpersonal drama and whining that they are not being paid attention to and that people don’t respect them, instead of doing the excellent thing which is to acknowledge that respect is always earned, step up and engage the community, and earn that respect. This has also happened, and is almost an inevitable anti-pattern that arises out of trying to be radically open.

excuse my sub par writing, I am dictating this

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I think you can say Noisebridge IS radically open compared to other spaces for hackers in the community. That’s for sure.

It’s just a side-effect though not part of the definition.

yeah we absolutely are. go to NYC resistor, they’re open one day a week to the public. pretty much every other hacker space I’ve been to is far more private than we are. from what I remember from talking to Mitch the rationale for being as open as we are is to reduce the barrier to entry for the people who will make good members of our community.

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